Browser Update required

Welcome to our website.

Unfortunately, you are using an out-of-date browser version that does not support all the features of this web site.

For security reasons and for a better surfing experience, we ask you to update your browser to the latest version.

Prehistoric Life

Back from the Dead

Designed to thrill and enlighten children and adults alike, our stunning five-coin Prehistoric Life: Back from the Dead series brings the magnificent creatures that once roamed Europe back from extinction.

Developed in collaboration with the Natural History Museum Vienna, where the fossilised remains of the dinosaurs and early mammals featured on the coins are currently on display, the series spans the last quarter of a billion years in our planet's existence.

From the Triassic to the Quaternary, each Proof quality silver coin highlights evolutionary milestones from five geologic periods. Linking these chronologically, all five coins also features a timeline that gives the series a sense of continuity and guarantees collectors will be keen to complete this captivating collection.

A gateway to the fascinating and frightening world of prehistoric monsters, our free augmented reality App provides in-depth background information and brings the long-extinct creatures back to life in moving images that will delight coin collectors of all ages.

Timeline

As permanent as 250 million years may seem in the existence of life on our planet, English naturalist Charles Darwin proved that evolution is an ongoing process. All five coins in our Prehistoric Life: Back from the Dead series are graced with a timeline corresponding to their geologic period that reflects this sense of evolution, gives the series a sense of continuity and guarantees that collectors of all ages will be keen to complete this fascinating collection.

Triassic

The first period of the Mesozoic era, the Triassic spanned from 251 to 200 million years ago but was only named in 1834 by German geologist Friedrich von Alberti, after the three (tri) distinctive rock layers common to much of northwestern Europe. During the lower Triassic almost all the planet's land mass consisted of one giant supercontinent called Pangaea. In the middle Triassic, the landmass began to drift apart, gradually forming the Tethys Ocean. Fish, reptiles and ammonites swam in the ocean and the first species of modern coral came into existence. Life on the hot and dry land was dominated by vertebrates called therapsids while, towards the end of the period, dinosaurs began to appear.

Jurassic

Roughly spanning from 200 to 145 million years ago, the Jurassic made up the middle of the Mesozoic era when the supercontinent broke up to form the continents of North America, Eurasia and the southern continent of Gondwana, as the Atlantic Ocean also began to form. Named after the Jura mountain range in the western Alps, where strata from the period were first identified by Prussian naturalist Alexander von Humboldt, the Jurassic was the heyday of the dinosaur, some of which were the largest animals to ever walk the Earth. Much smaller, some of the first flying vertebrates coexisted alongside them, including the Archaeopteryx or Urvogel, the 'original bird'.

Cretaceous

Ending after an asteroid collided with Earth 66 million years ago, the Cretaceous, which gets its name from the latin for chalk (creta), was the last period of the Mesozoic era and spanned some 80 million years. A time characterised by a warm climate and subsequent high sea levels from which only a few islands protruded, many shallow inland seas covered the planet and led to marine deposits containing fossilised shell fish, coral and ammonites. On land, dinosaurs, including the famous Struthiosaurius austriacus found in a coal mine in 1859 near Vienna, continued to dominate.

Tertiary

Actually divided into the Paleogene and Neogene periods of the Cenozoic era, Tertiary is the unofficial but still commonly used term for the geologic period that spanned from 65 to 2.6 million years ago. Common during the period, tectonic activity some 50 million years ago caused the Indian sub-continent to collide with Asia and led to the formation of the Himalayas. In Europe, the Alps, Pyrenees and Carpathian mountains appeared, while the Tethys Ocean shrank to become the Mediterranean Sea. The climate cooled so much during this period that the first glacier appeared at the South Pole about 30 million years ago. The eventual extinction of the dinosaurs allowed the establishment of new habitats in Europe by mammals such as early elephants, giraffes, antelopes and even sabre-toothed tigers.

Quaternary

Still continuing today, the Quaternary period began 2.6 million ago. Marked by extreme temperature fluctuations, including a series of glaciations during which up to 30 per cent of the Earth's surface was covered with ice and snow, this period has really put the adaptability of flora and fauna, especially mammals, to the test. During warm periods the hippopotamus and woolly rhinoceros could be found in Europe, whereas menacers and mammoths spread during cold periods, though these large mammals died out at the end of the last ice age around 12,000 years ago. Needless to say, Homo sapiens also came into being during this youngest of all geologic periods.

Prehistoric Life: Back from the Dead comes with two superb packaging options:

Specially designed with the classic coin collector in mind, the Classic edition explains the scientific know-how and background to the series.

classic coin collector

The Discovery edition is far more than a collector case and features even more scientific information as well as a wealth of exciting surprises through which prehistoric life really comes alive. As a special extra, it comes with a poster and fluorescent sticker that glows in the dark.

Discovery edition

Downloadable entirely free of charge, our purpose-built augmented reality App is the gateway to the fascinating and frightening world of prehistoric monsters.

From now on you can not only find out everything about the mysterious creatures that appear in our Prehistoric Life: Back from the Deadcoin series but also enjoy an exciting game that features the nothosaurus and other prehistoric animals.

Test your skill at finding coins in our new game "Coin Quest" by steering different 3D prehistoric animals through a realistic environment. To play the game, use your mobile device to move in all directions to earn points by clicking on the hidden coins. To help you find the location of the coins, you can exchange five seconds of your time for a clue using the help button. If you find all the coins before your time runs out, you receive bonus points. Once you have collected all the coins at one level, you can proceed to the next level. The game ends when you fail to collect all the hidden coins in the allocated time.

To download and activate our free augmented reality App just follow the links below. As soon as the App is fully downloaded click on it to start the feature. The Exit button takes you straight back to the Austrian Mint homepage.

App Store

Google play
App

Back from the Dead

Designed to thrill and enlighten children and adults alike, our stunning five-coin Prehistoric Life: Back from the Dead series brings the magnificent creatures that once roamed Europe back from extinction.

Developed in collaboration with the Natural History Museum Vienna, where the fossilised remains of the dinosaurs and early mammals featured on the coins are currently on display, the series spans the last quarter of a billion years in our planet's existence.

From the Triassic to the Quaternary, each Proof quality silver coin highlights evolutionary milestones from five geologic periods. Linking these chronologically, all five coins also features a timeline that gives the series a sense of continuity and guarantees collectors will be keen to complete this captivating collection.

A gateway to the fascinating and frightening world of prehistoric monsters, our free augmented reality App provides in-depth background information and brings the long-extinct creatures back to life in moving images that will delight coin collectors of all ages.

Timeline

As permanent as 250 million years may seem in the existence of life on our planet, English naturalist Charles Darwin proved that evolution is an ongoing process. All five coins in our Prehistoric Life: Back from the Dead series are graced with a timeline corresponding to their geologic period that reflects this sense of evolution, gives the series a sense of continuity and guarantees that collectors of all ages will be keen to complete this fascinating collection.

Triassic

The first period of the Mesozoic era, the Triassic spanned from 251 to 200 million years ago but was only named in 1834 by German geologist Friedrich von Alberti, after the three (tri) distinctive rock layers common to much of northwestern Europe. During the lower Triassic almost all the planet's land mass consisted of one giant supercontinent called Pangaea. In the middle Triassic, the landmass began to drift apart, gradually forming the Tethys Ocean. Fish, reptiles and ammonites swam in the ocean and the first species of modern coral came into existence. Life on the hot and dry land was dominated by vertebrates called therapsids while, towards the end of the period, dinosaurs began to appear.

Jurassic

Roughly spanning from 200 to 145 million years ago, the Jurassic made up the middle of the Mesozoic era when the supercontinent broke up to form the continents of North America, Eurasia and the southern continent of Gondwana, as the Atlantic Ocean also began to form. Named after the Jura mountain range in the western Alps, where strata from the period were first identified by Prussian naturalist Alexander von Humboldt, the Jurassic was the heyday of the dinosaur, some of which were the largest animals to ever walk the Earth. Much smaller, some of the first flying vertebrates coexisted alongside them, including the Archaeopteryx or Urvogel, the 'original bird'.

Cretaceous

Ending after an asteroid collided with Earth 66 million years ago, the Cretaceous, which gets its name from the latin for chalk (creta), was the last period of the Mesozoic era and spanned some 80 million years. A time characterised by a warm climate and subsequent high sea levels from which only a few islands protruded, many shallow inland seas covered the planet and led to marine deposits containing fossilised shell fish, coral and ammonites. On land, dinosaurs, including the famous Struthiosaurius austriacus found in a coal mine in 1859 near Vienna, continued to dominate.

Tertiary

Actually divided into the Paleogene and Neogene periods of the Cenozoic era, Tertiary is the unofficial but still commonly used term for the geologic period that spanned from 65 to 2.6 million years ago. Common during the period, tectonic activity some 50 million years ago caused the Indian sub-continent to collide with Asia and led to the formation of the Himalayas. In Europe, the Alps, Pyrenees and Carpathian mountains appeared, while the Tethys Ocean shrank to become the Mediterranean Sea. The climate cooled so much during this period that the first glacier appeared at the South Pole about 30 million years ago. The eventual extinction of the dinosaurs allowed the establishment of new habitats in Europe by mammals such as early elephants, giraffes, antelopes and even sabre-toothed tigers.

Quaternary

Still continuing today, the Quaternary period began 2.6 million ago. Marked by extreme temperature fluctuations, including a series of glaciations during which up to 30 per cent of the Earth's surface was covered with ice and snow, this period has really put the adaptability of flora and fauna, especially mammals, to the test. During warm periods the hippopotamus and woolly rhinoceros could be found in Europe, whereas menacers and mammoths spread during cold periods, though these large mammals died out at the end of the last ice age around 12,000 years ago. Needless to say, Homo sapiens also came into being during this youngest of all geologic periods.

Prehistoric Life: Back from the Dead comes with two superb packaging options:

Specially designed with the classic coin collector in mind, the Classic edition explains the scientific know-how and background to the series.

classic coin collector

The Discovery edition is far more than a collector case and features even more scientific information as well as a wealth of exciting surprises through which prehistoric life really comes alive. As a special extra, it comes with a poster and fluorescent sticker that glows in the dark.

Discovery edition

Downloadable entirely free of charge, our purpose-built augmented reality App is the gateway to the fascinating and frightening world of prehistoric monsters.

From now on you can not only find out everything about the mysterious creatures that appear in our Prehistoric Life: Back from the Deadcoin series but also enjoy an exciting game that features the nothosaurus and other prehistoric animals.

Test your skill at finding coins in our new game "Coin Quest" by steering different 3D prehistoric animals through a realistic environment. To play the game, use your mobile device to move in all directions to earn points by clicking on the hidden coins. To help you find the location of the coins, you can exchange five seconds of your time for a clue using the help button. If you find all the coins before your time runs out, you receive bonus points. Once you have collected all the coins at one level, you can proceed to the next level. The game ends when you fail to collect all the hidden coins in the allocated time.

To download and activate our free augmented reality App just follow the links below. As soon as the App is fully downloaded click on it to start the feature. The Exit button takes you straight back to the Austrian Mint homepage.

App Store

Google play
App

Other Products in Series

Quaternary − Life on the ground

Tertiary − Life on the ground

Cretaceous - Life on the ground

Jurassic – Life in the air

Triassic – Life in the water

Prehistoric Life Packaging – Discovery Edition

Prehistoric Life Packaging – Classic Edition